Yongsoo Park Lab

NeuroBiology

RIBOMONE - Yongsoo Park Lab

RESEARCH

<p>1. We study microRNA exocytosis by LDCV fusion. Our research and data are opening the new field and concept that microRNA can be a novel neuromodulator, which is stored inside the vesicle and released together with classical neurotransmitters by vesicle fusion, thereby contributing to cell-to-cell communication.</p>
<p>2. My group aims to investigate the molecular mechanisms of vesicle fusion by combining interdisciplinary techniques that include cell biological, biophysical, and biochemical tools.</p>
<p>3. We focus on neuronal differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) as a disease model of autism and neurodegenerative disorders. hiPSCs-derived neurons can be used for personalized medicine to cure autism and neurodegenerative disorders.</p>

1. We study microRNA exocytosis by LDCV fusion. Our research and data are opening the new field and concept that microRNA can be a novel neuromodulator, which is stored inside the vesicle and released together with classical neurotransmitters by vesicle fusion, thereby contributing to cell-to-cell communication.

2. My group aims to investigate the molecular mechanisms of vesicle fusion by combining interdisciplinary techniques that include cell biological, biophysical, and biochemical tools.

3. We focus on neuronal differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) as a disease model of autism and neurodegenerative disorders. hiPSCs-derived neurons can be used for personalized medicine to cure autism and neurodegenerative disorders.

<p>Although microRNA (miRNA) regulates gene expression inside the cell where they are transcribed, extracellular miRNA has been recently discovered outside the cells, proposing that miRNA might be released to participate in cell-to-cell communication (Front Endocrinol. 2017).</p>
<p>My group first reported the active exocytosis of miRNAs independently of exosomes in response to neuronal stimulation.</p>
<p>We propose a new function of non-coding RNAs named (‘ribomone’ = ribonucleotide + hormone), and suggest that miRNAs may function as hormones; i.e., miRNA is stored in vesicles and released by vesicle fusion in response to stimulation, thereby contributing to cell-to-cell communication.</p>

Although microRNA (miRNA) regulates gene expression inside the cell where they are transcribed, extracellular miRNA has been recently discovered outside the cells, proposing that miRNA might be released to participate in cell-to-cell communication (Front Endocrinol. 2017).

My group first reported the active exocytosis of miRNAs independently of exosomes in response to neuronal stimulation.

We propose a new function of non-coding RNAs named (‘ribomone’ = ribonucleotide + hormone), and suggest that miRNAs may function as hormones; i.e., miRNA is stored in vesicles and released by vesicle fusion in response to stimulation, thereby contributing to cell-to-cell communication.

Array

Vesicles in neurons and neuroendocrine cells store neurotransmitters and peptide hormones, which are released by vesicle fusion in response to Ca2+‐evoking stimuli. Synaptotagmin‐1 (Syt1), a Ca2+ sensor, mediates ultrafast exocytosis in neurons and neuroendocrine cells.

The molecular mechanisms by which Syt1 triggers vesicle fusion remain controversial; six molecular models of Syt1 are summarized above (FEBS Lett. 2018).

We are investigating to unveil the novel mechanisms of vesicle fusion using synthetic neurotransmission that reconstitutes the vesicle fusion process with purified native vesicles, i.e., synaptic vesicles and large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs). Synthetic neurotransmission allows us to directly explore the mechanisms of vesicle fusion.

Use of neuronal differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) as a disease model of autism and neurodegenerative disorders.

Some specific questions I wish to address are:

i) to identify functionally active iPSC-derived neurons using calcium imaging and automated patch clamp (APC) techniques.

ii) to examine that the mutantion of ion channels related to autism is corrected by CRISPR-Cas9 and edited ion channels recover the ionic current in iPSC neurons as an autism model.

Team

Array

Yongsoo Park, Ph.D.

Scientist / Assistant Professor


LinkedIn ResearchGate Google Scholar

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Yelda Birinci, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow


Postdoc, 2014-2017. Sabanci University

Research Assistant, 2007-2014. Karadeniz Technical University Medicine Faculty

Visiting Research Scientist, 2010-2013. Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna

Alumni

Alican Gümürdü Graduate Student

Obadah Al Bahra Graduate Student

Ramazan Yildiz Graduate Student

Selected Publications

#, Corresponding author

Full lists in PubMed.

  1. Park Y# and Ryu JK#. Models of synaptotagmin-1 to trigger Ca2+-dependent vesicle fusion. FEBS Lett. 2018 Nov;592(21):3480-3492.
  2. Park Y#, MicroRNA exocytosis by vesicle fusion in neuroendocrine cells. Front Endocrinol. 2017 Dec 22;8:355.
  3. Gümürdü A, Yildiz R, Eren E, Karakülah G, Ünver T, GENÇ Ş, and Park Y#. MicroRNA exocytosis by large dense-core vesicle fusion. Sci Rep. 2017 Mar 30;7:45661.
  4. Park Y, Seo JB, Fraind A, Pérez-Lara A, Yavuz H, Han K, Jung SR, Kattan I, Walla PJ, Choi MY, Cafiso DS, Koh DS, Jahn R. Synaptotagmin-1 binds to PIP2-containing membrane but not to SNAREs at physiological ionic strength. Nature Struct Mol Biol. 2015 Oct;22(10):815-823.
  5. Park Y, Vennekate W, Yavuz H, Preobraschenski J, Hernandez JM, Riedel D, Walla PJ, Jahn R. α-SNAP interferes with the zippering of the SNARE membrane fusion machinery. J Biol Chem. 2014 Jun 6;289(23):16326-16335.
  6. Park Y, Hernandez J. M, van den Bogaart G, Ahmed S, Holt M, Riedel D, and Jahn R. Controlling synaptotagmin activity by electrostatic screening. Nature Struct Mol Biol. 2012 Oct;19(10):991-997.
  7. Park Y and Kim KT. Dominant role of lipid rafts L-type calcium channel in activity-dependent potentiation of large dense-core vesicle exocytosis. J Neurochem. 2009 Jul;110(2):520-529.
  8. Park Y and Kim KT. Short-term plasticity of small synaptic vesicle (SSV) and large dense-core vesicle (LDCV) exocytosis. Cell Signal. 2009 Oct;21(10):1465-70.
  9. Park YS, Choi YH, Park CH, Kim KT. Non-genomic glucocorticoid effects on activity-dependent potentiation of catecholamine release in chromaffin cells. Endocrinology. 2008 Oct;149(10):4921-7.
  10. Park YS, Hur EM, Choi BH, Kwak E, Jun DJ, Park SJ, Kim KT. Involvement of protein kinase C-epsilon in activity-dependent potentiation of large dense-core vesicle exocytosis in chromaffin cells. J Neurosci. 2006 Aug 30;26(35): 8999-9005.
  11. (Cover article) Park YS, Jun DJ, Hur EM, Lee SK, Suh BS, Kim KT. Activity-dependent potentiation of large dense-core vesicle release modulated by mitogen-activated protein kinase(MAPK)/ERK signaling. Endocrinology. 2006 Mar;147(3):1349-56.

Latest News

  • Lab relocation: moving our lab to Qatar Biomedical Research Institute (QBRI), Hamad Bin Khalifa University (HBKU) in Education City, Qatar (Sep. 2019).
  • Our collaboration got published in Biophys. J in Jan, 2019.
  • Our paper is accepted in FEBS Lett in July, 2018.
  • Yongsoo co-organizes EMBO Sectoral Meeting on Lipid Biology, Heidelberg, Germany (23-24 April 2018).
  • Invited speaker in the Molecular Biology and Genetics Weekend, Boğaziçi University, Turkey (07 April 2018).
  • Yongsoo co-organizes EMBO Workshop: Exocytosis and endocytosis: From synaptic vesicles to nanodiscs (16 – 20 Jan 2018, Spain).
  • !!!New postdoc, Yelda, join Yongsoo Lab.
  • Invited speaker in International Yeditepe University Genetics and Bioengineering Student Congress, Turkey (10 Feb 2018)
  • Our paper is accepted in Front Endocrinol. in Dec. 2017.
  • Invited speaker in the 7th Asian Symposium o

Latest News

Contact



Address

Qatar Biomedical Research Institute (QBRI),
Hamad Bin Khalifa University (HBKU),
Education City, Doha, Qatar

PHONE & E-MAIL

Email: ypark@hbku.edu.qa